The Paris text was a political fix in which grand words masked inadequate deeds. The voluntary national emission reduction commitments since Paris now put the world on a path of 3.4°C of warming by 2100, and more than 5°C if high-end risks including carbon-cycle feedbacks are taken into account. The Paris outcome

Young people from across the world are utilizing the mobile application of Voices of Youth Maps to publicize local issues and promote positive change in their communities. In the lead up to COP21, 800 young reporters from communities in France, Ireland, Guatemala, Malaysia, China, the Kiribati Islands, Tanzania, Zambia, Niger,

You live in a coastal region where impacts from sea level rise are already evident. Your life or the life of someone you know has already been disrupted due to serious water stressors — either flood, fires, or droughts.  Your access to clean drinking water is threatened or non-existent.  The place you call home

Oxfam released its annual ‘shock and awe’ global economic disparity report at the World Economic Forum in Davos last week, with revelations that “82% of new wealth last year went to the richest 1% – while the poorest half got nothing.” During the four days of last week’s meeting, Oxfam

But as you look around, your gaze falls on a newspaper on the coffee table. The headline reads “Worldwide crop failures in 2049: How will we eat?” You hear the radio announcer talking about eco-terrorists, the hijacking of supermarket trucks, extreme weather and poor air quality. Flip through a ledger

By 2050, projections suggest that 2/3 of the world’s population will be residing in cities, a statistic that affirms the need to convert urban landscapes to sustainable, healthy, and environmentally prosperous environments. “Is future urbanization going to be a good thing or a bad thing?” asks filmmaker Oscar Boyson. “If